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Everyone has heard of the mineral magnesium, but very few people know exactly what it is and what it is used for. That is exactly why this article should benefit you and expand your knowledge in this regard.

With the help of our big magnesium tablet test 2022, we will give you all the information you need about magnesium tablets. You will not only learn why this mineral is so important for our body and what it does, but also which criteria are important when buying a magnesium tablet.




Summary

  • Magnesium is an essential mineral. It is vital for the body, but cannot be produced by the body itself; at best, it must be taken in through food.
  • If there is a magnesium deficiency in the body, it is advisable to take magnesium supplements.
  • Magnesium tablets are available as lozenges, chewable tablets or effervescent tablets. Depending on your own preference, you can choose the form that suits you best and replenish your magnesium supply.

The best Magnesium Tablets: Our Picks

Buying and evaluation criteria for magnesium tablets

Dosage form

Magnesium tablets can be taken in different forms. For example, there are magnesium tablets to chew, to swallow or in the form of an effervescent tablet. Depending on your preference, you can choose between these three types.

For example, if you have difficulty swallowing a tablet, the effervescent or chewable form is right for you. However, if you don’t like the taste of magnesium, a magnesium film-coated tablet is more suitable.

Quantity

The quantity of a magnesium tablet pack can vary from 10 tablets to several hundred tablets. So you can get anything from a small pack to a large pack. Depending on your magnesium needs, a large box of magnesium tablets can last up to a whole year.

However, the amount of magnesium contained in a pack of magnesium tablets should also be taken into account. It is easy to reach for a large pack of magnesium in the hope that it will last as long as possible. However, a smaller pack of magnesium tablets can sometimes contain the same amount of magnesium and therefore last just as long.

Dosage

As mentioned earlier, there can be differences in the dosage of magnesium tablets. Whereas some magnesium tablets are lower dosed, other magnesium tablets may be higher dosed.

The typical dosage of magnesium tablets is between 250 and 400 milligrams.

Taste

Whereas magnesium film-coated tablets are usually neutral in taste, magnesium chewable tablets and, above all, magnesium effervescent tablets have a variety of flavours to choose from.

Magnesium tablets are available in different flavours.

Flavours such as lemon, orange, cherry or apple are available. Of course, there are also neutral-tasting magnesium offers with these two dosage forms. If you would like to try something out in terms of taste, it is advisable to buy a few magnesium supplements in different flavours to find out which taste appeals to you the most.

Guide: Frequently asked questions about magnesium tablets answered in detail

What do we need magnesium for?

Magnesium is actually needed for various functions. We have summarised the most important functions for you below:

  • Electrolyte balance: Magnesium has a stabilising effect on the electrolyte balance. This supplies our cell membrane and thus the cell with important nutrients, which has a positive effect on the functioning of the cells (1).
  • Nervous system: Magnesium also has a positive influence on our nervous system. With the help of other electrolytes and nutrients, it regulates the conduction of excitation in the nerve cells. Consequently, it is involved in the transmission of signals via the nervous system. However, if there is a deficit in the magnesium balance, this leads to increased irritability of the nerve cells. As a result, the nervous system now sends more signals than necessary (2).
  • Muscle function: Energy is needed for functioning muscle function. This can be guaranteed by the electrolyte balance, as the muscles are supplied with all important nutrients with the help of magnesium (3, 4). Magnesium also has an antispasmodic effect if the muscle cramps due to an electrolyte deficit (3, 5).
  • Teeth and bones: Magnesium helps stabilise bones and teeth. Magnesium also supports tooth and bone growth. In addition, with the help of magnesium, calcium in the blood is transported to the bones where it is deposited and utilised (6, 7).
  • Cell division: Magnesium has an activating effect on enzymes. Because of this, it helps cells to divide without errors (4, 8).
  • Blood pressure: Magnesium regulates blood pressure, among other things. It therefore has an influence on the occurrence of thromboses, strokes, heart attacks and high blood pressure. It also has a very positive effect on the overall health of the heart (4, 9).
Magnesium influences a variety of processes in the human body

Since magnesium has several important functions for our body, adequate magnesium intake is essential (10). A balanced food intake is therefore significantly important. If there is a magnesium deficiency, it is essential to supplement with food supplements to ensure that all the described functions run smoothly (10, 11).

When and for whom is it useful to take magnesium tablets?

In principle, every body needs a certain amount of magnesium (12). If you have a magnesium deficiency, you need to ensure that your body receives sufficient magnesium to maintain the functions of your organism (10, 11).

Magnesium Tabletten

If you are regularly active in sports, this will affect your physical need for magnesium. The more sporty you are, the more magnesium your body needs. (Image source: Bruno Nascimento / unsplash)
It also makes sense to supplement magnesium if you have to do a lot of physically and mentally demanding work over a longer period of time. Your current life situation therefore determines whether an additional intake of magnesium is particularly important for you (13, 14, 15, 16). The life situations that influence your magnesium needs are explained in more detail in the following paragraphs.

How much magnesium does the body need?

Depending on your age and gender, a certain amount of magnesium per day is recommended (10). According to the German Nutrition Society (DGE), the physiological daily requirement of magnesium is about 4.5 milligrams per kilogram of body weight (17). On average, the daily requirement for adolescents from the age of 15 and adults is between approximately 300 and 400 milligrams of magnesium (12).
Your gender, age and life situation determine the optimal amount of magnesium for you.
Other life situation factors such as your sporting activity (13), exposure to chronic stress (14), present illnesses (15), your alcohol consumption (16) and the existence of a pregnancy (20) also determine the recommended amount of magnesium your organism needs.
Especially during pregnancy, for competitive athletes, alcoholics and people suffering from severe stress, an additional amount of magnesium is recommended (13, 14, 16). Despite all this, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) recommends taking a maximum of 250 milligrams of magnesium per day in the form of dietary supplements and otherwise using foods containing magnesium (18).
Too high a magnesium dose can have a laxative effect (10). Dosages higher than 250 milligrams should only be taken in consultation with a doctor.

How much do magnesium tablets cost?

As magnesium tablets do not require a prescription, they can be purchased online via the goods retailer Amazon, but also via the online portals of pharmacies and drugstores and in their stores.

In terms of price, however, there are some differences here. Depending on the quality of the magnesium, the package size and the amount of content, as well as the dosage form, the price will vary.

When buying magnesium, it is also important to consider the exact ingredients and additives used by the manufacturers. The three different dosage forms are in the following price categories:

dosage form price
effervescent tablet 2-20€
film-coated tablet 3-25€
chewable tablet 6-30€

This means that you would have to pay the most for a chewable tablet. Effervescent tablets, on the other hand, are the cheapest. Despite all this, it has to be said that there are no drastic differences in price between the three different dosage forms.

What kind of magnesium tablets are there?

In fact, there are three very common types of magnesium tablets that are preferred differently from person to person. These free types are as follows:

  • Effervescent tablet: This type of magnesium tablet is dissolved in a glass of water for consumption and thus drunk. This variant is therefore particularly suitable for those who have difficulty swallowing tablets.
  • Film-coated tablets: In this form of administration, a whole tablet is placed in the mouth and swallowed. This type of intake is the most common as the magnesium can be absorbed most quickly by the body (19).
  • Chewable tablet: This type of magnesium tablet does not require swallowing. As the name suggests, the tablet is simply chewed and the magnesium is absorbed in the process.

All three types of magnesium tablets have their advantages and disadvantages. So it is completely up to your personal preference which dosage form suits you best.

What are the alternatives to magnesium tablets?

Since magnesium can also be easily absorbed into the body through food, it is advisable to follow a balanced diet. Among other things, foods such as nuts, seeds, bananas, spinach and pulses have been scientifically proven to have a high magnesium content (10, 11).

Magnesium Tabletten

Spinach has a high magnesium content. Its consumption is therefore ideal for those who suffer from a magnesium deficiency. (Image source: Louis Hansel / unsplash)

However, if you want to use dietary supplements, other forms such as magnesium tablets are also suitable as an alternative:

  • Magnesium lozenges
  • Magnesium capsules
  • Magnesium granules
  • Magnesium powder

Which dietary supplement you finally decide on is therefore entirely dependent on your preferences.

How do I recognise a magnesium deficiency?

If your magnesium level is below 1.2 mg/dL, you will usually experience some symptoms (21). However, because symptoms often overlap with other signs due to quite low magnesium levels, it is more difficult to attribute a particular symptom to low magnesium (22). As a result, some symptoms can be named that can be associated with a magnesium deficiency (21, 22). These are as follows:

System signs of illness
Neuromuscular weakness, numbness, tremors, tingling, muscle twitching
Cardiomuscular heart rhythm disturbances, calcification of the artery
Central nervous system depression, agitation, behavioural fluctuations, brain disease, strokes
Gastrointestinal loss of appetite, dizziness, vomiting
Metabolism potassium and calcium deficiency

Headache is also a symptom that often accompanies a magnesium deficiency. However, this finding has not yet been scientifically substantiated (21).

Conclusion

For our body, magnesium is an essential mineral needed for important processes. Without the necessary amount of magnesium, the body may show some symptoms that can limit and affect it on different levels. To ensure adequate magnesium intake, a balanced diet should be aimed for.

Those who still have low magnesium levels despite all this may turn to the dietary supplement of magnesium tablets. In fact, these are available in three different dosage forms. Nevertheless, in addition to the advantage of the magnesium tablet in bringing the magnesium level back into the normal range, it should not be forgotten that too much magnesium can also influence other bodily processes. Before taking magnesium, it is therefore advisable to adjust the amount to be administered according to need.

Image source: unsplash / Hal Gatewood

References (22)

1. Ahmed, F., & Mohammed, A. (2019). Magnesium: The Forgotten Electrolyte-A Review on Hypomagnesemia. Medical sciences (Basel, Switzerland), 7(4), 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7040056
Source

2. Vink, R., & Nechifor, M. (2011). Magnesium in the Central Nervous System. Adelaide (AU): University of Adelaide Press.
Source

3. Reno AM, Green M, Killen LG, OʼNeal EK, Pritchett K, Hanson Z. Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Muscle Soreness and Performance. J Strength Cond Res. 2020 Oct 1. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003827.
Source

4. Dørup I, Clausen T. Effects of magnesium and zinc deficiencies on growth and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and the heart. Br J Nutr. 1991 Nov;66(3):493-504. doi: 10.1079/bjn19910050.
Source

5. Garrison, S. R., Allan, G. M., Sekhon, R. K., Musini, V. M., & Khan, K. M. (2012). Magnesium for skeletal muscle cramps. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 2012(9), CD009402. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD009402.pub2
Source

6. Welch, A. A., Skinner, J., & Hickson, M. (2017). Dietary Magnesium May Be Protective for Aging of Bone and Skeletal Muscle in Middle and Younger Older Age Men and Women: Cross-Sectional Findings from the UK Biobank Cohort. Nutrients, 9(11), 1189. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111189
Source

7. Castiglioni S, Cazzaniga A, Albisetti W, Maier JA. Magnesium and osteoporosis: current state of knowledge and future research directions. Nutrients. 2013 Jul 31;5(8):3022-33. doi: 10.3390/nu5083022
Source

8. Wolf FI, Cittadini A. Magnesium in cell proliferation and differentiation. Front Biosci. 1999 Aug 1;4:D607-17. doi: 10.2741/wolf.
Source

9. Houston M. The role of magnesium in hypertension and cardiovascular disease. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2011 Nov;13(11):843-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7176.2011.00538.x.
Source

10. Institute of Medicine (IOM). Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D and Fluorideexternal link disclaimer. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997.
Source

11. Rude RK. Magnesium. In: Ross AC, Caballero B, Cousins RJ, Tucker KL, Ziegler TR, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 11th ed. Baltimore, Mass: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012:159-75.
Source

12. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung e. V.: "Referenzwerte Magnesium", abgerufen am 29. Dezember 2020.
Source

13. Bohl C.H., Volpe S.L. Magnesium and exercise. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2002;42:533–563. doi: 10.1080/20024091054247
Source

14. Cuciureanu, M.D., &, Vink, R. (2011) Magnesium and stress. In: Vink R, Nechifor M, editors. Magnesium in the Central Nervous System [Internet].
Source

15. Geiger, H., & Wanner, C. (2012). Magnesium in disease. Clinical kidney journal, 5(Suppl 1), i25–i38. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndtplus/sfr165
Source

16. Rude RK. Magnesium. In: Coates PM, Betz JM, Blackman MR, Cragg GM, Levine M, Moss J, White JD, eds. Encyclopedia of Dietary Supplements. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Informa Healthcare; 2010:527-37.
Source

17. Becker, U. (2016): "Magnesium – Der beliebteste Mineralstoff", PTA Forum online, abgerufen am 29. Dezember 2020.
Source

18. BfR (2017). BfR bewertet empfohlene Tageshöchstmenge für die Aufnahme von Magnesium über Nahrungsergänzungsmittel. DOI 10.17590/20171212-074919
Source

19. Ranade VV, Somberg JC. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of magnesium after administration of magnesium salts to humans. Am J Ther 2001;8:345-57.
Source

20. Dalton, L. M., Ní Fhloinn, D. M., Gaydadzhieva, G. T., Mazurkiewicz, O. M., Leeson, H., & Wright, C. P. (2016). Magnesium in pregnancy. Nutrition reviews, 74(9), 549–557. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuw018
Source

21. Phuong-Chi T, Phuong-Anh T, Son V. Hypomagnesemia: a clinical perspective. Int J Nephrol Renovasc Dis. 2014; 7: 219–230. Published online 2014 Jun 9. Doi: 10.2147/IJNRD.S42054
Source

22. Abdullah M. Al A., Sandawana William M., Henrik F. Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions. Int J Endocrinol. 2018; 2018: 9041694. Published online 2018 Apr 16. Doi: 10.1155/2018/9041694
Source

Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Ahmed, F., & Mohammed, A. (2019). Magnesium: The Forgotten Electrolyte-A Review on Hypomagnesemia. Medical sciences (Basel, Switzerland), 7(4), 56. https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7040056
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Vink, R., & Nechifor, M. (2011). Magnesium in the Central Nervous System. Adelaide (AU): University of Adelaide Press.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Reno AM, Green M, Killen LG, OʼNeal EK, Pritchett K, Hanson Z. Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Muscle Soreness and Performance. J Strength Cond Res. 2020 Oct 1. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003827.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Dørup I, Clausen T. Effects of magnesium and zinc deficiencies on growth and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and the heart. Br J Nutr. 1991 Nov;66(3):493-504. doi: 10.1079/bjn19910050.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Garrison, S. R., Allan, G. M., Sekhon, R. K., Musini, V. M., & Khan, K. M. (2012). Magnesium for skeletal muscle cramps. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 2012(9), CD009402. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD009402.pub2
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Welch, A. A., Skinner, J., & Hickson, M. (2017). Dietary Magnesium May Be Protective for Aging of Bone and Skeletal Muscle in Middle and Younger Older Age Men and Women: Cross-Sectional Findings from the UK Biobank Cohort. Nutrients, 9(11), 1189. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9111189
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Castiglioni S, Cazzaniga A, Albisetti W, Maier JA. Magnesium and osteoporosis: current state of knowledge and future research directions. Nutrients. 2013 Jul 31;5(8):3022-33. doi: 10.3390/nu5083022
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Wolf FI, Cittadini A. Magnesium in cell proliferation and differentiation. Front Biosci. 1999 Aug 1;4:D607-17. doi: 10.2741/wolf.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Houston M. The role of magnesium in hypertension and cardiovascular disease. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2011 Nov;13(11):843-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7176.2011.00538.x.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Institute of Medicine (IOM). Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D and Fluorideexternal link disclaimer. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Rude RK. Magnesium. In: Ross AC, Caballero B, Cousins RJ, Tucker KL, Ziegler TR, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 11th ed. Baltimore, Mass: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012:159-75.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Ernährung e. V.: "Referenzwerte Magnesium", abgerufen am 29. Dezember 2020.
Go to source
Wissenschaftliche Studie
Bohl C.H., Volpe S.L. Magnesium and exercise. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2002;42:533–563. doi: 10.1080/20024091054247
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Cuciureanu, M.D., &, Vink, R. (2011) Magnesium and stress. In: Vink R, Nechifor M, editors. Magnesium in the Central Nervous System [Internet].
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Geiger, H., & Wanner, C. (2012). Magnesium in disease. Clinical kidney journal, 5(Suppl 1), i25–i38. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndtplus/sfr165
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Rude RK. Magnesium. In: Coates PM, Betz JM, Blackman MR, Cragg GM, Levine M, Moss J, White JD, eds. Encyclopedia of Dietary Supplements. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Informa Healthcare; 2010:527-37.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Becker, U. (2016): "Magnesium – Der beliebteste Mineralstoff", PTA Forum online, abgerufen am 29. Dezember 2020.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
BfR (2017). BfR bewertet empfohlene Tageshöchstmenge für die Aufnahme von Magnesium über Nahrungsergänzungsmittel. DOI 10.17590/20171212-074919
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Ranade VV, Somberg JC. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of magnesium after administration of magnesium salts to humans. Am J Ther 2001;8:345-57.
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Dalton, L. M., Ní Fhloinn, D. M., Gaydadzhieva, G. T., Mazurkiewicz, O. M., Leeson, H., & Wright, C. P. (2016). Magnesium in pregnancy. Nutrition reviews, 74(9), 549–557. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuw018
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Phuong-Chi T, Phuong-Anh T, Son V. Hypomagnesemia: a clinical perspective. Int J Nephrol Renovasc Dis. 2014; 7: 219–230. Published online 2014 Jun 9. Doi: 10.2147/IJNRD.S42054
Go to source
Wissenschaftlicher Artikel
Abdullah M. Al A., Sandawana William M., Henrik F. Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions. Int J Endocrinol. 2018; 2018: 9041694. Published online 2018 Apr 16. Doi: 10.1155/2018/9041694
Go to source
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